Avner Ronen Visits Cornell

Many Cornellians fear pursuing entrepreneurship after graduation because they believe it may not lead to long term careers. Avner Ronen disproves this myth. So far, he has launched three companies and sold two of them to major firms. For Ronen, entrepreneurship is a lifestyle instead of an ideal.

Dimitri: Giving You the Power to Create

The concept of 3D printing is rapidly growing in the manufacturing industry, but there is still significant room for growth in the consumer market (learn more about industry trends here). To leverage this opportunity, Valerie Mack (Master of Professional Studies, ’17), Khalil Hajji (Master of Engineering, 2017), Mutahir Kazmi (Master of Engineering, ‘17), and Leo Jingyang Liu (Master of Architecture, ‘18) founded Dimitri: a startup that aims to bring autonomy and consumer centricity to the world using 3D printing.

Aditya Agashe (’17) Redesigns Startup Technology

In an era where technology is deemed one of the most important channels in which businesses reach and connect to their customers, building the right website and mobile applications is key. Aditya (Adi) Agashe, a senior in the College of Engineering majoring in computer science with a business minor, helps Cornell-affiliated entrepreneurs, startups, and alumni build their technology platforms through Belle Apps: a software consulting company that creates websites and mobile applications tailored for each client’s business needs.

A Real World Education – Shaan Franchi and Stuart Wang Discuss Vispio

Have you ever felt a disconnect between what you were learning in school and the “real world”? Students rejoice; teachers have felt it, too. The downside, however, is that most teachers don’t know how to fix it. Teachers, especially at the middle school and high school level, are consistently evaluated on how well their students perform on tests designed for a set curriculum. In other words, teachers don’t have much incentive to distract their students from that set curriculum by spending class time each week discussing news and other world events.

While educators have struggled with this problem, a group of students from Cornell has found the solution: Vispio.